jeudi 28 mai 2015

Rock / Austin / Hogan / Cena merchandise sales & Salary



Very interesting stuff published by Smackdown Lights on wrestlingforum.com on 11-29-2013 http://www.wrestlingforum.com/general-wwe/1040033-merchandise-sales-salary-figures-rock-austin-hogan-cena-their-peak-year.html



Merchandise sales and Salary figures of Rock/Austin/Hogan/Cena in their peak year



Austin/Hogan/Rock/Cena are the four megastars of pro wrestling,of course the latter falling into that realms or not is a matter of debate.

If you randomly ask anybody on the internet regarding merchandise sales,he will say Steve Austin sold most following Hulk Hogan and then John Cena and then The Rock.



Quote:
source welovewrestling.net

TOP SELLING VIDEO GAME (ALL FORMATS)
1) SMACKDOWN VS RAW 2008 (PS2,PSP,PS3,360,WII,DS) - 6.78 MILLION SOLD
2) SMACKDOWN VS RAW 2010 (PS2,PSP,PS3,360,WII,DS) - 4.42 MILLION SOLD
3) SMACKDOWN VS RAW 2009 (PS2,PSP,PS3,360,WII,DS) - 3.13 MILLION SOLD 
4) SMACKDOWN SHUT YOUR MOUTH (PS2) - 2.83 MILLION SOLD
5) SMACKDOWN VS RAW 2006 (PS2) - 2.66 MILLION SOLD

TOP SELLING HOME VIDEO
1) VIVA LA RAZA THE EDDIE GUERRERO STORY - 276,411 COPIES SOLD
2) BECAUSE STONE COLD SAID SO - 267,786 COPIES SOLD
3) THE RISE AND FALL OF ECW - 216,052 COPIES SOLD
4) HULK HOGAN REAL AMERICAN - 202,426 COPIES SOLD
5) HULK HOGAN THE ULTIMATE ANTHOLOGY - 190,407 COPIES SOLD


TOP WWE MERCHANDISE SELLERS

1) STONE COLD STEVE AUSTIN - No surprise to see The Rattlesnake at the top of the list. Any merchandise record before Austin 3:16 was smashed during the Austin era. The Austin 3:16 was the highest selling peice of Austin merchandise with sales currently at 2.3 million Units(yes it is still selling!)

2) HULK HOGAN - The power of Hulkamania remains powerful as the Hulkster sits at number two. During the early ninties, Hulk Hogan merchandise was all that mattered to wrestling fans with the Hulkamania t-shirt selling 1.9 million units

3) JOHN CENA - The Cenation is going from strenghth to strength as merchandise sales fly out for the master of thuganomics. With each version of Cena t-shirt means huge sales with Cena's Orange Never Give Up t-shirt being the most popular

4) THE ROCK - The great one remains electrifying as merchandise sales have picked up since his return. Despite many t-shirts from the great one it is the Brahma Bull t-shirt that sold the most

5) Triple H - It is a surprise to see The Game in the top 5 because of the many stints as a heel but he pipped Rey Mysterio into the top 5. Due to The Game's popularity his t-shirt sales far out strip the 619.
(not including DX merchandise)
This is completely fake.It fails to mention its source.You can also notice the grammatical errors.

http://www.forbes.com/forbes/1999/0322/6306216a.html

The article says that Austin sold 12 million T-Shirts and earned a salary of more than $5 million.
This premise is completely skewed.A superstar receives 20% cut-off of the his merchandise revenue,if Austin indeed sold 12 million T-Shirts in 1998 at $20 a pop,then he should have earned a salary of no less than 48 million and the total WWE merchandise revenue gross should have been at-least 240 million whereas WWE's total revenue itself in 1998 was 56 million.
It is impossible for Austin or any other superstar to sell 12 million T-Shirts in a single year and still make such a low revenue.

I came across a discussion in a forum linked to Dave Meltzer.
http://wrestlingclassics.com/cgi-bin...c;f=9;t=056698

The discussion is regarding 'Highest Paid Wrestlers'

Meltzer's post
Quote:
Best years ever

Austin $13 million
Rock $10 million
Hogan $8 million (in WCW, best in WWF was $6 million)

Baba always took in most of his income as a promoter. Most I ever heard a Japanese pro wrestler earning was Ogawa at between $3.5 million and $4 million last year, but a lot of that was from fighting and merchandise. Then again, Austin, Rock & Hogan made a large percentage of their big years in merchandise as well.
He is talking about salaries of Rock,Austin and Hogan and not merchandise sales.

He also says
Quote:
Hogan got 25% of the company's PPV gross (43% of the total gross) for every show that he appeared on. He didn't work every PPV.

He got $25,000 for every TV taping and 25% of every house show he worked.

He also had a favorable merchandise deal.

1998 would have been the company's best year so you could chart the buys and figure from there.

His percentages were far higher than Rock or Austin ever got, but their merchandise so far outsold his to the point it's not even in the same solar system.
So according to Meltzer,both Rock and Austin have clearly outsold Hogan by a wide margin.


So in this video,he is talking about salaries.

http://www.pwinsider.com/ViewArticle.php?id=26119
Quote:
During their 3 year marriage she claimed that Austin earned as much as $12 million a year.
I will take the middle way and put Austin's 1998 salary as 12.5 million.

According to Meltzer,Rock's salary in 2000 was 10 million.

http://www.kehoe73.freeserve.co.uk/infoearnings.htm
Quote:
These are the big money earners in wrestling. In this bracket are Big Show ($1 million per year until 2009; $20,000 (£13,000) per week), Triple H, Kurt Angle, Undertaker & Steve Austin. Also in this bracket is The Rock, whose earnings were around $10 million (£6 million) in 2001.
I don't know how accurate this is,but 2000 was Rock's peak year with peak ratings and buyrates,if Rock's salary in 2001 was 10 million then it would certainly be higher in 2000.

http://www.imageshack.com/i/0kb0pgp
Ebony reports that Rock earned a salary of 15 million in 2000.Still we don't know how accurate this is so I will take a fair way and put Rock's salary at 13 million.

Highest salary earners for a single year in my opinion.
1>The Rock-13 million(2000)
2>Steve Austin-12.5 million(1998)
3>Hulk Hogan-8 million(1997)
4>John Cena-5 million(date unknown)

Regarding merchandise revenue gross of 2000
http://www.notablebiographies.com/ne...-The-Rock.html
Quote:
In addition, The Rock became a merchandising gold mine. His image appeared on T-shirts, posters, and Halloween masks; and there were Rock action figures and video games. By the 2000s, according to Gillian Flynn of Entertainment Weekly, the WWF was bringing in $120 million in merchandise sales per year, thanks solely to Johnson.
That's a massive number.WWE doesn't even gross 100 million in merchandise today.

Regarding merchandise revenue gross of 1998
http://www.cpyu.org/Page.aspx?id=77000
Quote:
The WWF sold over $1 billion(100 million)in merchandise during 1998.
So I think its really a matter of debate between Rock and Austin.WWE grossed about $120 million merchandise revenue when Rock was at his peak and grossed about $100 million merchandise revenue when Austin was at peak.Austin sold more T-Shirts than Rock but Rock covers up with video games and action figures.

I think Austin slightly edges Rock in merchandise sales but the difference is negligible.

http://www.wrestlezone.com/news/2429...h-seller-new-1
CM Punk's last quarter merchandise sales in 2011 were very impressive and superceded Cena's for the entire year.So I think he is up there in top 5 behind Cena.

Top merchandise sellers in my opinion.
1>Austin
2>The Rock(The difference between Austin and Rock is negligible)
3>Hulk Hogan
4>John Cena
5>CM Punk.



Published by Smackdown Lights on wrestlingforum.com on 11-29-2013
http://www.wrestlingforum.com/general-wwe/1040033-merchandise-sales-salary-figures-rock-austin-hogan-cena-their-peak-year.html


http://www.wrestlingforum.com/wwe-raw-smackdown/759346-will-john-cena-now-fully-accepted-hogan-austin-rocks-league.html
http://wrestlingonearth.com/seven-things-7-mount-rushmores-of-wrestling/
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1333737-hulk-hogan-john-cena-the-16-worst-cases-of-overcoming-the-odds/

mercredi 27 mai 2015

Monday Night War Wrestlers Salary




Posted on another board, from Powerslam magazine:


Quote:

According to Hulk Hogan’s unofficial biography, he pocketed $10m per year at his peak in the 1980’s. Similarly, according to Powerslam magazine, Hogan signed with WCW on a deal that saw him pocket $300,000 per appearance + 25% of every PPV live gate/merchandise sale + a further percentage of the actual PPV gross. Furthermore, the highest one match pay off ever seen in wrestling at that time, Hogan and Sting pocketed $1.5m each for their Starrcade 1997 match.

Steve Austin's first WCW contract, which he signed in May 1991, paid him $75,000 per year. In 1994, Austin inked a two-year contract extension with WCW, worth $275,000 per annum. It is estimated that ''Stone Cold' earned over $5 miilion per year in 1998 and 1999 when he was riding high as the WWF's premier babyface. Debra Marshall, Austin's ex-wife, claimed that he earned ''as much as $12 million per year'' from 1998-2001. If that figure is accurate, it would make Austin the highest paid wrestler on a yearly basis ever.

Leon '(Big Van) Vader' White was one of the top 3 earners in pro wrestling in 1993. That year, he signed a four-year contract with WCW, worth $625,000 per annum, and an eight-match deal with Japan's wroked shoot UWFI, which paid him a not inconsiderable $25,000 per match.

Lex Luger, another muscle-bound star of the 1980's, earned $500,000 per year as WCW champion in 1991-Feb 1992. As c0-host of Vince Mcmahon's short lived World Bodybuilding Federation bodystars programme, also in 1992, Luger earned $350,000 per year. As a wrestler Luger made more then $350,000 per year for most of his 1993-1994 run in the WWF - and earned in the $500,000-a-year range from WCW when he returned to the league on his first episode of Monday Nitro on September 4, 1995. Luger's annual WCW salary rose to $750,000 a few years later and then leapt to somewhere in the region of 1.25 million by 2000.

David Arquette recieved $20,000 from WCW to perform a suprise run-in on the Buff Bagwell vs. Kanyon match at the New Blood Rising pay-per-view on August 13, 2000. No one cared....

Paul ''Big Show'' Wight, earnt in the region of $1 million as a WWF/WWE wrestler. Mcmahon offered him a ten-year-contract in Feb 1999, with a $950,000-per-annum downside guarantee. The WWE renegotiated the terms of his contract earlier this decade after trimming two years off the deal.

Randy Savage earned approx $1 million during his first reign as WWF champion (March 27, 1988 to April 2, 1989). 'The Macho Man' would pocket a similar salary as an aging WCW headliner in 1998-1999.

Paul Heyman signed a five-year contract with the WWF/WWE in spring 2001. Which him a basic salary of $250,000 per annum. When he acted as the on-screen manager of Brock Lesnar and Big Show, Heyman was paid a talent salary ($60-$80,000) in addition to his basic.

After Brock Lesnar won the 2000 NCAA heacyweight wrestling title, lesnar became somewhat of a bidding war between the WWF, WCW and New Japan. With three seperate parties competing for his services, Lesnar was able to to drive his price tag up to $250,000 per annum: the deal he inked with the WWF remains the largest developmental contract ever offered by the company. When he split from the WWE in 2004 to pursue an NFL career, Lesnar walked away from a $1 million.

WCW then-Chicago Bull's superstar Dennis Rodman $1.5 million in 1997 to make several appearances and wrestle in one tag team match (with Hollywood Hulk Hogan vs. The Giant and Lex Luger) at the year's Bash At The Beach PPV.

Mike Tyson received the princely sum of $3.5 million for his handful of appearances and his enforcer role at Wrestlemania XIV.

Clueless weightlifter Mark Henry was resented by WWF wrestlers when he signed a ten-year, $250,000-per-annum guaranteed with the federation in 1996. Only a handful of wrestlers had been offered guaranteed /downside contracts by the WWF at that point.

Marcus ''Buff'' Bagwell was paid $600,000 per year by WCW in 1999-2000.

Torrie Wilson earned £250,000 per year when she worked for WCW (1999-2001). Throwing in her Playboy appearances, Wilson should have banked more then that during her peak years as a WWE diva (2003-2004).

Steve 'Sting' Borden has became a very rich man from pro wrestling. In 1992-1993, he was earning $750,000 per annum as WCW's star babyface. By the end of the decade, WCW was lining his pockets to the tune of $1.25 million per year. TNA had to rustle up a $500,000-per-annum deal in order to lure Sting out of retirement in December 2005.

Juventud Guererra made $200,000 per year as a WCW wrestler from autumn 1998 to October 2000 (when he was fired by WCW, following his infamous drug fuelled rampage and arrest in the Marriott Hotel in Brisbane, Australia).

Paul 'Triple H' Levesque testified that he had a $400,000-per-annum downside guarantee (minimum salary) in his contract. Given his top wrestler/booker status, it's suprising that his downside contract was that low. Triple now earns nearly $2 million (basic salary) as a WWE wrestler and booker between his wrestling appearances and other royalties.

The Ultimate Warrior earned in excess of $2 million per year as a WWF headliner in 1990-1991 (he specifically received a one-night payoff in excess of $650,000 for his match with Hulk Hogan at Wrestlemania VI, and a one-night payoff of $550,000 for his bout with Randy Savage at Wrestlemania VII). In order to lure him out of retirement in 1998, WCW had to pay Warrior $1 million upfront.

Ric Flair earned $700,000 per year as Jim Crockett promotions' top star and NWA world Champion in 1987-1988. As WCW's premier player in 1990-1991, he made in the region of $730,000 per year. Back in WCW, he made $750,000 per year at the end of the 1990's. During a divorce hearing (from second wife Beth) in 2005, Flair claimed that he earned $500,000 per year in WWE.

Jeff Jarrett demanded and received a one-night payoff in the region of $175,000 from Vince to drop the WWF IC title as scheduled to Joanie 'Chyna' Laurer at No Mercy on October 17, 1999. Jarrett would return to WCW the next night on Monday Night Nitro after signing a contract worth $425,000 per year.

Booker T/King Booker made somewhere in the region of $750,000 per annum in WCW in 2000-2001.

Roddy Piper signed a two-year deal with WCW in October 1996 which was worth at least $1.1 million per annum.

Bam Bam Bigelow earned in the region of $500,000 as a WWF wrestler in 1995 (the year of his famous Wrestlemania XI match with Lawrence Taylor), $2,0000 per week in ECW from 1997-1998, and $450,000 per year in WCW from 1998-2001.

Kurt Angle had a $1 million-per-annum downside guarantee when he was employed by the WWE in 2006. It's been reported he made atleast $3 million in the year 2000. We believe he earns slightly less then seven-figures from TNA. However, on a per-appearance basis, he earns more as a TNA wrestler then he did in the WWF/WWE.

Trish Stratus earned more than $400,000 per year at her peak in the WWE.

Joanie 'Chyna' Laurer certainly earned a lot more then $400,000 in 2000-2001. Wrestling, merchandise and royalties, TV apperances, her autobiography (If They Only Knew), workout video (Chyna Fitness) and her Playboy cover (November 2000) pushed her earnings close or above the $1 million mark.

Kevin Nash earned an incredible $1.625 million per year as a WCW wrestler in 2000-2001. When he returned to the WWF/WWE in 2002, Nash was paid a yearly $700,000 downside by the company.

Taz(z) secured himself a $250,000-per-annum downside when he signed with the WWF in 1999.

Vince Russo made $350,000 per year as a member of the WWF booking team in 1999.

Radicals Chris Benoit, Eddie Guerrero, Dean Malenko and Perry Saturn all left WCW in January 2000 and signed three-year contracts with the WWF. Benoit, whom WWF management believed had the most potential of the four, was signed to a $400,000 annual downside guarantee. Benoit certainly earned more then that in 2004 when he held the WWE World Title for five months. At the time of his death, his downside had risen to $500,000 per year. Guerrero, Malenko and Saturn each recieved $250,000-per-annum downsides when they signed with the WWF in January 2000.

Bill Goldberg was WCW's top earner when the company was bought out by the WWF in March 2001. Golderg's contract paid him $2 million per year. When he signed with the WWE two years later, Goldberg's contract had a $1 million downside guarantee.

Bubba Ray and D-Von Dudley were earning $600 per match apeice when they made thier last appearance for ECW in August 1999. Bubba and D-Von, who made thier WWF debut the following month became stars in January 2000 following thier memorable tables match with The Hardy Boyz at Royal Rumble. A few weeks later, Edge and Christian joined the fray and made it a three-way fued, which all six men were rewarded creatively and financially over the next year. The Dudleyz and Edge & Christian must have made in excess of $300,000 each in 2000-2001. As big-time merchandise-sellers, Matt Hardy and Jeff Hardy should have earned quite a bit more.

Bret Hart made approx $250,000 per year as a WWF mid-carder in 1990-1991. His earnings steadily increased as he climbed the ladder and exceeded $400,000 per year by the time he captured his second WWF title in 1994. Two-and-a-half years later, Hart became the subject of a bidding war between the WWF and WCW. Hart, whose WWF contract had just expired, was offered $2.8 million per year by WCW. The WWF countered with a 20-year contract, which would pay him $1.5 million per annum for the first three years and a low six-figure amount for the last 17 years. Hart accepted that offer, and signed the deal in October 1996. It was a decision he would regret. In September 1997, Vince informed Hart that cash-strapped WWF was unable to continue paying his $1.5 million salary, and advised him to strike a deal with powerhouse WCW. Hart reluctantly did so - for $2.5 million per year.

Diamond Dallas Page was earning a staggering $1.25 million per year when WCW folded in 2001. Page always denied that his friendship with WCW boss Eric Bischoff had any bearing on his advancement in WCW: Page insisted that his headline status, seven-figure-salary and three WCW World title reigns were the product of good, old fashioned hard work. Who was he kidding?


''Thanks...But No, thanks''

Randy Savage was offered a guaranteed $500,000-per-annum deal by WCW to jump ship in 1991. Savage turned WCW down because he had no wish to take a pay cut.

WWE offered Mike Goldberg a three-year contract, worth $500,000 per annum, in October 2005 to become the lead announcer on Raw. Though the figures exceeded his combined UFC and Fox Sports Network salary, Goldberg, citing a desire to remain in the sports world, declined WWE's offer.

Bob Sapp was offered a $1 million annual contract by the WWE in 2006. Sapp was unable to accept the deal because he was under contract to K-1.

The Iron Sheik was reputedly offered $100,000 by AWA promoter Verne Gagne to double-cross and legitimately injure Hulk Hogan in thier WWF title match on January 23, 1984 at Madison Square Garden. To preserve his relationship with Vince Mcmahon jr. and Hogan, Sheik declined Gagne's alleged offer.

Sid 'Vicious' Eudy was offered a three-year contract by WCW, worth $400,000 per annum, in early 1991. Eudy rejected the deal and signed a contract with the WWF.

Rick Steamboat turned down a $225,000-per-annum offer from WCW in summer of 1989 and left the company. A man of principle, 'The Dragon' felt he was worth closer to $300,000 per year and would not work for less then his asking price.







Published by LilOlMe on wrestlingforum.com
http://www.wrestlingforum.com/classic-wrestling/767522-old-wrestling-salaries-find-them-here.html
http://cavemancircus.com/2014/10/09/old-wrestling-salaries/

lundi 25 mai 2015

Pure WWF/WWE Financials 1994-2013

Image result for wwe

Chris Harrington assembled WWF/WWE Financials to provide more comprehensive looks.

Pure WWF/WWE Financials 1994-2013 

(in million dollars)


START5/1/19945/1/19955/1/19965/1/19975/1/1998
END4/30/19954/30/19964/30/19974/30/19984/30/1999
FISCAL YEARFY1995FY1996FY1997FY1998FY1999
PPV EVENTS512121212
PPV BUYS1,868,9002,831,7002,252,2002,936,1005,365,100
REVENUE$87.35$85.82$81.86$126.23$250.34
Net income (loss)$(4.43)$3.20$(6.51)$8.47$56.03
EBIDTA
$7.71-($4.96)$12.15$58.93
ATTENDANCE1,163,259931,9541,060,7401,576,1122,273,701
EVENTS347247199218199

START5/1/19995/1/20005/1/20015/1/20025/1/2003
END4/30/20004/30/20014/30/20024/30/20034/30/2004
FISCAL YEARFY2000FY2001FY2002FY2003FY2004
EVENTS1212121212
PPV BUYS6,884,6008,010,4007,135,4645,378,1005,604,000
REVENUE$377.90$438.14$409.62$374.30$374.91
Profit Contribution$158.34$188.86$158.50$136.90$167.80
Net income (loss) 
including XFL and
the World
$58.91 
$15.99

$42.23

-$(19.20)
$48.2 
Net income (loss) 
excluding XFL and
the World
$59.58 $62.90$37.60 $16.1$49.6  
EBIDTA$87.24$92.92$55.23$37.6$85.9
Attendance2,485,1002,449,8002,032,7541,815,1001,647,900
Events206212237327329
Profit Contribution %41.9%43.1%38.7%36.6%44.8%
EBIDTA %23.1%21.1%13.5%10.0%22.9%

START5/1/20045/1/20051/1/20061/1/20071/1/2008
END4/30/20054/30/200612/31/200612/31/200712/31/2008
FISCAL YEARFY2005FY2006CY2006CY2007CY2008
PPV EVENTS1416161514
PPV BUYS5,280,8006,241,1005,744,0005,218,0005,034,400
REVENUE$366.43$400.05$415.30$485.66$526.46
Profit Contribution$153.10$172.90$170.40$186.90$214.70
Net income (loss)$39.10$47.05$48.80$52.14$45.42
EBIDTA$62.20$81.00$74.30$77.80$83.40
ATTENDANCE1,617,4301,713,8401,975,5002,115,3002,203,300
EVENTS325300308308319
Profit Contribution %41.8%43.2%41.0%38.5%40.8%
EBIDTA %17.0%20.2%17.9%16.0%15.8%

START1/1/20091/1/20101/1/20111/1/20121/1/2013
END
12/31/2009
12/31/2010
12/31/2011
12/31/2012
12/31/2013
FISCAL YEAR
CY2009
CY2010
CY2011
CY2012
CY2013
EVENTS
14
13
13
12
12
PPV BUYS
4,490,200
3,631,100
3,842,100
4,023,000
3,838,000
REVENUE
$475.16
$477.60
$483.90
$484.00
$508.00
Profit Contribution
$219.30
$203.40
$168.70
$199.60

Net income (loss)
$50.30
$53.50
$24.80
$31.40
$2.80
EBIDTA
$91.60
$94.00
$52.00
$63.20
$30.40
ATTENDANCE
2,383,800
2,155,700
1,976,500
1,854,100
1,919,500
EVENTS
342
327
321
314
321
Profit Contribution %
46.2%
42.6%
34.9%
41.2%

EBIDTA %
19.3%
19.7%
10.7%
13.1%
6.0%

Notes: 
  • Information was pulled from a combination of SEC filings, Trending Schedules and WWE Investor Presentations
  • Note that while all periods are 12 months, 2006 is represented twice - a FY2006 (May 2005-April 2006) and a CY2006 (Jan 2006-Dec 2006)
  • In 2013 the company switched from EBITDA to OIBDA but retained the same calculation. Profit Contribution was not listed on the 2013 Trending Schedule.
  • Various charges 
    • XFL and The World: $1.4M (FY2004), $35.6M (FY2003), $0.3M (FY2002), $48.5M (FY2001), $0.7M (FY2000)
    • Hotel/Casino: bought $10.9M (FY1999), sold $11.3M (FY2000)
    • WWE Studios: $11.7M (CY2013), $1.3M (CY2012), $23.4M (CY2011), $1.9M (CY2008), $15.7M (CY2007)
    • Reversal of accrued licensing agent commissions: -$7.9M (FY2004)
    • Legal Settlements: $7.0M (FY2001), $6.2M (FY2003), -$5.9M (FY2004)
    • Early Termination of Office Space Lease: $0.7M (FY2003)
  • On the 2/20/14 Conference Call, CFO George Barrios noted that WWE had spent about $12M on WWE Network development in 2013 which along with the film impairment charges is likely what drove the major dip in EBITDA/OIBDA and Net Income in 2013.

Revenue Streams by Segment

(in Million$)

START5/1/19995/1/20005/1/20015/1/20025/1/2003
END
4/30/2000
4/30/2001
4/30/2002
4/30/2003
4/30/2004
FISCAL YEAR
FY2000
FY2001
FY2002
FY2003
FY2004
PPV
$106.40
$128.20
$112.00
$91.10
$95.30
Live Events
$68.90
$82.00
$74.50
$72.90
$70.20
TV Rights
$12.10
$35.30
$53.30
$58.50
$71.00
Advertising
$77.90
$90.20
$83.70
$72.90
$59.50
Licensing + Other
$43.70
$37.40
$24.40
$22.50
$22.60
Home Entertainment
$20.00
$12.20
$13.60
$13.80
$21.40
Merchandise
$21.50
$22.00
$26.20
$22.50
$18.60
Publishing
$16.20
$18.40
$17.60
$15.20
$10.70
WWE.com
$11.10
$12.50
$4.40
$4.90
$5.60

START5/1/20045/1/20051/1/20061/1/20071/1/2008
END
4/30/2005
4/30/2006
12/31/2006
12/31/2007
12/31/2008
FISCAL YEAR
FY2005
FY2006
CY2006
CY2007
CY2008
PPV
$85.50
$94.80
$93.60
$94.30
$91.40
Live Events
$78.70
$75.00
$83.70
$99.30
$105.70
TV Rights
$78.00
$81.50
$85.50
$92.40
$100.70
Advertising
$43.70
$22.60
$7.40
$5.90
$7.40
Licensing + Other
$21.60
$32.70
$32.70
$47.90
$61.80
Home Entertainment
$20.10
$42.60
$49.90
$53.70
$58.50
Merchandise
$18.00
$27.90
$35.50
$37.70
$37.00
Publishing
$12.20
$11.10
$12.40
$16.50
$15.40
WWE.com
$7.80
$9.70
$11.00
$16.20
$16.30
WWE Studios
$0.00
$0.00
$0.00
$16.00
$24.50
WWE 24/7
$0.80
$2.20
$3.60
$5.80
$7.80

START1/1/20091/1/20101/1/20111/1/20121/1/2013
END
12/31/2009
12/31/2010
12/31/2011
12/31/2012
12/31/2013
FISCAL YEAR
CY2009
CY2010
CY2011
CY2012
CY2013
PPV
$80.00
$70.20
$78.30
$83.60
$82.50
Live Events
$108.80
$104.60
$104.70
$103.70
$111.50
TV Rights
$111.90
$127.00
$131.50
$139.50
$160.90
Advertising
$7.70
$5.90
$1.10
$1.40
$2.50
Licensing + Other
$46.80
$54.30
$56.80
$48.80
$46.40
Home Entertainment
$39.40
$32.10
$30.40
$33.00
$24.30
Merchandise
$35.80
$32.40
$33.90
$33.60
$34.90
Publishing
$13.50
$11.00
$7.70
$6.00
$5.70
WWE.com
$16.80
$14.90
$12.50
$19.70
$23.00
WWE Studios
$7.70
$19.60
$20.90
$7.90
$10.80
WWE COD
$6.80
$5.60
$6.10
$6.80
$5.50

Notes:
  • Information was pulled from a combination of SEC filings, Trending Schedules and WWE Investor Presentations
  • Note that while all periods are 12 months, 2006 is represented twice - a FY2006 (May 2005-April 2006) and a CY2006 (Jan 2006-Dec 2006)
  • I would recommend looking at TV Rights+Advertising together.  TV Rights represent both domestic and international TV Rights deals.
  • Merchandise is a combination of Venue Merchandise and WWEShop and Catalog Sales
  • Licensing + Other is Licensing plus Consumer Products Other
  • WWE 24/7 is really the Live and Televised Entertainment Other category (which included WWE Classics on Demand, fka WWE 24/7)


Please feel free to use these numbers for your own analysis and articles! 

It would be kind that if should you choose to use these numbers as a "source of truth", please link back to this page.  I've tried my best to verify the numbers, and where there were changes, use the latest version of the data.  I will try to post corrections and additional information here in the future.

-Chris Harrington
twitter: @mookieghana
email: chris.harrington@gmail.com


Original link (thanks to Chris Harrington):
http://indeedwrestling.blogspot.ca/2014/02/pure-wwfwwe-financials-1994-2013.html

LinkWithin

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...